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Uber and Queensland Launch scUber, the World’s First Rideshare Submarine, on the Great Barrier Reef

Uber and Queensland Launch scUber, the World’s First Rideshare Submarine, on the Great Barrier Reef

PRESS RELEASE On World Oceans Day (Saturday 8 June), scUber, the world’s first rideshare submarine on the Great Barrier Reef, geared up for its second wave of riders in Tropical North Queensland. From Sunday 9 June, scUber will be available to book exclusively via the Uber app in Cairns, Port Douglas or Palm Cove. scUber rides commenced on...

First Western Australian Road Built with Plastic Bags and Toner Cartridges

First Western Australian Road Built with Plastic Bags and Toner Cartridges

PRESS RELEASE The City of Cockburn will be the first Local Government in Western Australia to pave its roads with waste. Cecilia and Skerne Lanes in Frasers Property Australia’s masterplanned waterfront community, Port Coogee, will be sealed with 750sqm of Reconophalt made from 40,000 plastic bags, 900 toner cartridges, 210 kilograms of crumb rubber from...

Circular Fashion: Turning Old Clothes into Everything From New Cotton to Fake Knees

Circular Fashion: Turning Old Clothes into Everything From New Cotton to Fake Knees

Australia has a fashion problem. More than 500,000 tonnes of clothing waste is sent to landfill each year. But a new way of recycling could redirect some of our unwanted textiles from polluting the environment, by repurposing cotton waste into anything from new clothes to prosthetic knees. Developed by our team at Deakin University, where...

How to Have Better Arguments About the Environment (or Anything Else)

How to Have Better Arguments About the Environment (or Anything Else)

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. From climate change to armed conflict, our world is struggling with urgent global issues. But disagreements about how to solve them can spiral out of control. The only way to resolve intractable conflicts is to overcome desire to talk to allies more often than opponents....

Labor’s Election Loss Was Not a Surprise If You Take Historical Trends Into Account

Labor’s Election Loss Was Not a Surprise If You Take Historical Trends Into Account

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Authors: Sarah Cameron, Research Fellow, University of Sydney and Ian McAllister, Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Australian National University. Polls had predicted a narrow win for Labor in this election, so what explains the Coalition victory? Data from the Australian Election Study (AES), based on public...

How Should I Vote if I Care About Preventing the Extinction of Nature?

How Should I Vote if I Care About Preventing the Extinction of Nature?

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Some voters heading to the polls this weekend may be casting their ballot with biodiversity in mind, after a major UN report released last week highlighted the global extinction crisis facing more than a million species. Australia is an extinction hotspot: we are second only...

UK Becomes First Country to Declare a ‘Climate Emergency’

UK Becomes First Country to Declare a ‘Climate Emergency’

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Author: Chris Turney, Professor of Earth Science and Climate Change, ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage, UNSW. Last week a bipartisan UK Parliament passed an extraordinary measure: a national declaration of an Environment and Climate Emergency. The UK is the first national...

Young People Won’t Accept Inaction on Climate Change, and They’ll Be Voting in Droves

Young People Won’t Accept Inaction on Climate Change, and They’ll Be Voting in Droves

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Author: Hannah Feldman, PhD Researcher in Science Communication, Australian National University. Youths are often brushed off as being politically disengaged, but the Australian Electoral Commission has reported record high numbers of youth enrolment, and climate change will be at the forefront of their minds when many...

View From the Hill: Shorten Had the Content, Morrison Had the Energy in First Election Debate

View From the Hill: Shorten Had the Content, Morrison Had the Energy in First Election Debate

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Author: Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra. The Perth studio audience of undecided voters gave the campaign’s first rdebate to Bill Shorten by a decisive margin. Of the 48 present, 25 thought the opposition leader won, 12 believed the night was Morrison’s and...

Government Advertising May be Legal, But it’s Corrupting Our Electoral Process

Government Advertising May be Legal, But it’s Corrupting Our Electoral Process

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Author: Joo-Cheong Tham, Professor, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne. The Coalition government’s use of taxpayer money for political advertising – as much as A$136 million since January, according to Labor figures – is far from an aberration in Australia. It is part of a sordid...

Animal Rights Activists in Melbourne: Green-Collar Criminals or Civil ‘Disobedients’?

Animal Rights Activists in Melbourne: Green-Collar Criminals or Civil ‘Disobedients’?

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Author: Piero Moraro, Lecturer in Criminal Justice, Charles Sturt University. Thirty-nine people were arrested in Melbourne over an animal rights protest that blocked a major intersection. The protest caused chaos for commuters during the morning peak hour, and politicians and the media were quick to condemn...