Sustainable Fashion to Raw Organic Food: An Eco Bloggers Life

Home Lifestyle Sustainable Fashion to Raw Organic Food: An Eco Bloggers Life
Sustainable Fashion to Raw Organic Food: An Eco Bloggers Life

For the final week of our #FriendshipFeb collaboration, Jackie Pinedo and I decided to swap sustainable fashion blogging for sustainable food. As green lifestyle bloggers, it is fair to say that a big step towards sustainable lifestyle is buying (and in my case growing) organic food.

Food is what fuels us through the day giving us the energy to complete activities such as work, study, errands and exercise. If you are looking to live an optimal life with high energy and a life free from illness and disease, food is a good starting point. More importantly, organic food. As nutrition expert Heather Morgan aptly put it: “Every time you eat or drink, you are either feeding disease or fighting it.”

I am one of those people who constantly think about food. What do I feel like eating? What am I going to eat? What am I going to have for lunch? What should I cook for dinner? What can I use up tomorrow?

Organic Red Cabbage Salad

Now I’m not going to lie: I’m quite particular about what I eat.

I don’t eat red meat or white meat such as chicken and pork.

I am a vegetarian who will infrequently eat some seafood and fish (once every quarter usually) although increasingly I am turning away from these due to concerns about decreasing fish stocks and ocean pollution. I play this by ear as my first time as a vegetarian many moons ago ended up in low blood pressure and near anaemia and so am careful and pay close attention to what my body needs.

I prefer cooking food quickly because I’m time poor. I also think the ‘slow method’ of cooking such as stewing and oven roasting not only uses up more energy, but depletes food of vital nutrients. The longer a food is heated, the less vitamins available for consumption. If you’re interested in learning more about this, refer to my post The Vegetarian Cook.

It’s no surprise with my interest in health and nutrition that I am a massive raw food fan.

WHAT IS RAW FOOD?

Karen Knowler, the Raw Food Coach, defines raw food as: “food that has not been heated above 48 degrees centigrade (117 degrees Fahrenheit). This usually means uncooked foods, or more specifically, foods in their natural state.”

Now I’m not religious about my raw food intake. I don’t aim for a 100% raw food diet or even 70%. My general rule of thumb is having at least one raw meal per day. This is usually in the form of a raw organic green smoothie as it is the quickest and simplest way to get my daily vitamins and nutrients as well as use up our home grown organic produce.

There is another form of raw food that I love: salad.

Organic Red Cabbage Salad

For my very first sustainable food post, I thought I’d share a simple salad that is easy to prepare and that everyone loves. I make this salad at least once a fortnight.

ORGANIC RED CABBAGE SALAD RECIPE

Ingredients:

  • 1 head of organic red cabbage
  • 1 bunch of Italian (flat leaf) parsley, chopped finely
  • 1 bunch of spring onions (including white parts), sliced finely
  • 1/2 cup good quality cold pressed olive oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt (preferably Himalayan or Celtic sea salt)
  • Cracked pepper to taste

Method:

  1. Remove the outer cabbage leaves and cut your cabbage into pieces.
  2. Place in batches in your food processor and pulse quickly just a few times until chopped roughly. Don’t over process as your cabbage will get mushy.
  3. Toss the cabbage, parsley, spring onions with olive oil and lemon.
  4. Season to taste. You can also add more lemon juice and/or olive oil if you prefer.

Serves 6

Organic Red Cabbage Salad

Now of course being the casual amateur cook that I am and one with an organic veggie garden, I will often use whatever I can find growing in my backyard. Instead of spring onions I will often use the edible green stalk of shallots. If I don’t have lemons, I will resort to using lime. If my flat leaf parsley has gone to seed I will try and source the curly leaf variety (I grow both in my gardens). You can also add extra ingredients such as lettuce, basil, olives. Whatever tickles your fancy!

Give this red cabbage salad recipe a try and let me know what you think! Or if you’ve ever tried a version of this recipe, feel free to provide the recipe in the comments so I can give it a go myself.

Bon appetit!

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